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Orchestras | FIM Recommendations for a safe return to work

Empty concert hall Download the FIM Recommendations in PDF

I. Preamble

1. The covid-​19 out­break has led gov­ern­ments to close all live per­for­mance venues and pro­hib­it open-​air con­certs as soon as their coun­tries were hit by the pan­dem­ic. Three months lat­er, these mea­sures have brought the music sec­tor to its knees. Where finan­cial sup­port has been made avail­able for musi­cians, orches­tras or ensem­bles, it is gen­er­al­ly lim­it­ed in size, scope and dura­tion. In many cas­es, musi­cians are not eli­gi­ble to any support.

2. There is a com­mon desire of musi­cians, employ­ers and audi­ences to re-​open con­cert halls as soon as pos­si­ble, to allow the artis­tic activ­i­ty to resume.
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Argentina | Demise of María Laura Vigliecca

Laura Vigliecca

The Argentinian union SADEM and the Latin American group of FIM are in mourn­ing after the demise of María Laura Vigliecca, mem­ber of SADEM’s man­age­ment and pres­i­dent of OSDEM (Obra social de músicos).

A long-​time trade union­ist and a com­mit­ted fem­i­nist, María Laura par­tic­i­pat­ed in sev­er­al FIM meet­ings in Latin America, bring­ing her ener­gy, expe­ri­ence and excep­tion­al charis­ma. In October 2018, her pres­ence at the FIM region­al con­fer­ence ded­i­cat­ed to the rights of female musi­cians (Montevideo) sig­nif­i­cant­ly con­tributed to the suc­cess of this event.
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EAEA-​Pearle* press release re. EU recovery plans

EAEA-Pearle* logos

Brussels, 14 October 2020

European Social Partners of the Live Performance Sector call for a coor­di­nat­ed action plan to secure the recov­ery and sus­tain­abil­i­ty of the European cul­tur­al sector

PEARLE*- Live Performance Europe rep­re­sent­ing over 10 000 organ­i­sa­tions and the EAEA – European Arts and Entertainment Alliance, rep­re­sent­ing more than 150 unions, guilds, and asso­ci­a­tions and over 600 000 per­form­ers, tech­ni­cians and staff in the music, per­form­ing arts and live sec­tor – are call­ing on the EU insti­tu­tions and nation­al gov­ern­ments to adopt a coor­di­nat­ed approach includ­ing short-​term sup­port mea­sures and long-​term invest­ment to save the European cul­tur­al sec­tor amid a resur­gence of the Covid-​19 pan­dem­ic across Europe.
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FIM Vice President Roméo Dika in danger

Roméo Dika

Since he left the Presidential polit­i­cal par­ty, Cameroonian musi­cian Roméo Dika – also pres­i­dent of musi­cians union SYCAMU and FIM Vice President – has been the sub­ject of seri­ous intim­i­da­tion in his coun­try. Today, he fears for his safe­ty and that of his family.

As well as free­dom of expres­sion, free­dom of opin­ion is an essen­tial val­ue in Democracy. Like the entire trade union move­ment, FIM is deeply attached to the pro­tec­tion of this fun­da­men­tal free­dom and wish­es to express here its most pro­found concern.
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Revenues from audio streaming: the figures don’t add up

The streaming business model

The fig­ures pub­lished by the indus­try are clear: since 2012, the music stream­ing mar­ket has been pro­gress­ing con­tin­u­ous­ly. This growth is accel­er­at­ing year after year, in a spec­tac­u­lar way. In the United States, streaming-​generated rev­enues for 2019 exceed­ed the total record­ed music mar­ket for 2017 (RIAA data). The trend is the same on the British mar­ket, where fig­ures for 2019 set new records: for the first time, the annu­al num­ber of streams exceed­ed 100 bil­lion (BPI data).

As the stream­ing econ­o­my devel­ops, the ques­tions grow as to the way in which rev­enues are divid­ed between the var­i­ous sec­tor play­ers.
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Opera Australia | International support for the MEAA campaign

No opera without us

Throughout the world, live enter­tain­ment is under­go­ing seri­ous con­straints, fol­low­ing gov­ern­ment deci­sions tak­en in response to the Covid-​19 pan­dem­ic. These con­straints have brought about a drop in resources and seri­ous dis­or­gan­i­sa­tion of pro­grammes, in par­tic­u­lar where sym­pho­ny orches­tras or operas are concerned.

In the face of such an unprece­dent­ed sit­u­a­tion, it is essen­tial for all stake­hold­ers to work togeth­er to come up with suit­able strate­gies, in order both to pro­tect jobs and the mis­sions of these insti­tu­tions, over the short, medi­um and long terms.
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UK | Fix streaming to Keep Music Alive

UK campaign ‘Keep Music Alive’

The Covid-​19 cri­sis has hit music per­form­ers hard. Gigs have been can­celled, fes­ti­vals and per­for­mances post­poned, and record­ing stu­dios closed. It has brought into sharp relief the fact that musi­cians are sus­tained pri­mar­i­ly by income gen­er­at­ed by the live side of the music busi­ness and that stream­ing roy­al­ties are woe­ful­ly insufficient.

It would take 53 mil­lion Spotify streams to break even on a € 24,000 loss, a fig­ure that is unat­tain­able for most musi­cians. In the UK, one in five respon­dents to an MU sur­vey said they were con­sid­er­ing leav­ing music altogether.
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ILO | Child Labour Convention achieves universal ratification

First pub­lished on the ILO website

For the first time in the ILO’s his­to­ry, an International Labour Convention has been rat­i­fied by all Member States.

Convention No. 182 on the Worst Forms of Child Labour  achieved uni­ver­sal rat­i­fi­ca­tion, fol­low­ing rat­i­fi­ca­tion by the Kingdom of Tonga.

Ambassador for the Kingdom of Tonga, Titilupe Fanetupouvava’u Tuivakano, for­mal­ly deposit­ed the rat­i­fi­ca­tion instru­ments with ILO Director-​General, Guy Ryder on 4 August 2020.

The Convention is the most rapid­ly rat­i­fied Convention in the his­to­ry of the Organization, since its adop­tion 21 years ago by the International Labour Conference.
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ILO | COVID-​19 and the media and culture sector

ILO brief on covid-19 and the media and culture sector

This ILO brief high­lights the impact of COVID-​19 on the media and cul­ture sec­tor, hit hard by unem­ploy­ment and closed productions.

It analy­ses how the sector’s diver­si­ty in terms of con­tract types and occu­pa­tions cre­ates chal­lenges in access­ing social pro­tec­tion, safe­ty and health, and eco­nom­ic relief programmes.

The brief also offers pol­i­cy options, draw­ing from coun­tries’ exam­ples and ini­tia­tives from work­ers’ and employ­ers’ orga­ni­za­tions, to mit­i­gate the eco­nom­ic impact of the pan­dem­ic on the sector.

View/​download the ILO brief

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